Swing States Trump Campaign File Suit Claims Fraudulent Voting

election swing states

The swing states are becoming a headache for the Trump Campaign.

In American politics, swing states or battleground state) refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican presidential candidate by a swing in votes. These states are usually targeted by both major-party campaigns, especially in competitive elections.

Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden edged closer to a potential upset in Georgia and White House win after coming within 1 point of President Donald Trump in the traditionally red state Wednesday night.

As the race narrowed, Trump’s campaign announced that they had filed a lawsuit in the state, alleging that a GOP poll observer witnessed 53 late absentee ballots added to a pile in Chatham County,  a Democratic-leaning urban center in Savanah.

According to reports, Trump’s campaign has file suit alleging that the Democrat election officials to steal this election from President Trump with late, illegal ballots,’ Deputy Campaign Manager Justin Clark said.

Election Updates 

More totals from Georgia are expected Wednesday night. Trump held 49.9 per cent of the vote, while Biden had 48.9, with the president about 46,000 votes ahead.

The Georgia lawsuit was just the latest in a series of legal maneuvers Trump’s campaign made Wednesday as his path to re-election got narrower – and as the president made unfounded claims on Twitter about fraud.

UPDATE: Trump files new lawsuits in Georgia and Michigan after suing in PA and NV to stop the count as Biden wins in Michigan and Wisconsin and moves to within six electoral college votes of the White House.

More About Swing States

Swing States are usually targeted by party campaigns, especially in competitive elections. Meanwhile, the swing that regularly lean to a single party are known as safe states, as it is generally assumed that one candidate has a base of support from which they can draw a sufficient share of the electorate without significant investment or effort by their campaign.

Due to the winner-take-all method most states use to determine their presidential electors, candidates often campaign only in competitive states, which is why a select group of states frequently receives a majority of the advertisements and partisan media. The battlegrounds may change in certain election cycles and may be reflected in overall polling, demographics, and the ideological appeal of the nominees

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